Can A Dog Potty In A Wheelchair?

Have you been thinking about getting a dog wheelchair but you’re worried about your dog peeping and pooing freely? Can a dog potty in a wheelchair?

I was wondering this myself so I did a little digging. It’s always good to be prepared before this becomes a need later. It’s something I’m worried about for my little chihuahua mix Ella. She has a long body and more than one person has warned me I may need a wheelchair for her in her old age.

So after a little research I found the answer.

Yes, dogs can easily potty in a wheelchair. They were specifically designed to make this easy for old, disabled, or injured dogs. Most wheelchairs let them simply spread their legs and let their pee or poo naturally fall while missing the frame of the wheelchair. This is similar to how a dog harness or dog jacket is designed to let them potty without soiling the harness or jacket.

If you’d like to see this in action watch the video below showing a dog going potty in a K9 cart. It’ll show how a long bodied female urinates in one of these dog carts. In addition it shows how male dogs pee using the cart.

How Are Dog Wheelchairs Designed To Let Your Dog Poop Or Pee?

Yes, dog wheelchairs have specifically been designed to give enough space for your dog to poop or pee without hitting the wheelchair frame and making a mess.

Can A Dog Lean Over In A Dog Wheelchair?

Yes, in some wheelchairs like the front leg two wheeler from Eddie’s Wheels they can do this. Most rear wheelchairs don’t allow your dog to lean.

It will be awkward at first for them to get used to going to the bathroom like this but they will. With a little training and encouragement you can speed up the process.

Potty Problems For Disabled Dogs

Some dogs that use wheelchairs have other issues that make pooping or peeing a problem.

They may have incontinence and can’t keep it in long enough to get in the wheelchair and get outside. If this is a problem you can look at solutions like dog diapers or special beds that are easier to clean.

Another problem could be constipation and having trouble passing their feces. This is common for older dogs. Watch the video below for a demonstration on how to help a paralyzed dog express their pee and poop indoors. You can use these same methods outside while your dog is in a wheelchair.

How Train Your Dog To Poop Or Pee In Their Wheelchair

Use these tips to get your dog used to a new wheelchair and in turn help them learn to poop or pee while using it:

  1. Setup the dog wheelchair next to your dog’s bed where they hang out during the day. Let them get used to it’s smell and it just being around. Do this for a day or two prior to using it. You want them to feel safe around it on their own terms.
  2. Get some treats and get your praise game ready. You want to make this a positive experience for them.
  3. Conduct training for 15 minutes before meal time. The extra hunger will make the treats more effective.
  4. Slowly put the harness on the dog. Go slow at your dog’s pace. Offer them treats and praise for each step (e.g. one foot in) as needs be.
  5. When the harness is fully on give your dog treats and praise.
  6. Next, if applicable for your type of chair, add the rest of the chair components. A lot of chairs come together in pieces. Again, add these slowly with treats and praise.
  7. Start walking training once they are fully in the assembled dog wheelchair.
  8. Hold a treat at nose level. Let them smell it then give them one.
  9. Move a foot away and let them come to you. Treats and praise.
  10. Move farther away. Let them come to you. Treats and praise.
  11. Keep moving farther.
  12. Stop the training after 15 minutes.
  13. Repeat training 2-3 times a day.
  14. Eventually repeat all of the above outside.
  15. For poop and pee training take them outside before their poop and pee times, put on the dog wheelchair, and let them use it around the yard.
  16. Once they poop or pee, even if something goes wrong, give them treats and praise.
  17. Repeat 2-3 times a day or during their normal poop and pee times.