How to Cook Venison for Dogs (Easy Recipe)

Venison is low-fat meat that you can cook for your dog in several unique ways. The best methods for cooking venison for dogs include using the stovetop and crockpots.

Venison stew is the perfect meal for any dog looking for a low-carb, high-vitamin diet! Combine chunks of venison and mixed veggies in a pot of broth water, then roast them for 20-30 minutes on your stovetop.

Knowing how to cook venison for your dogs is helpful because venison is a healthy protein that is low in fat and carbohydrates. Venison is wonderful for dogs with food allergies that many vets suggest as an alternative to beef and poultry. 

How Do You Cook Venison for Dogs?

There are several ways that you can cook venison for dogs. The best way to cook venison for dogs is by cooking it on the stovetop or grill. 

Follow these basic instructions for cooking venison for dogs on the stovetop:

  • Mise en place ingredients
  • Mix dry ingredients
  • Mix wet ingredients 
  • Pour broth water into the pot
  • Mix dry and wet
  • Let venison cook

Venison is already a low-fat and low-carb meat. Because venison is low-carb, that means that it will not provide your pup with the energy that your dog needs to stay active. Supplement the lack of carbohydrates with brown rice or cooked potatoes. 

Furthermore, never fry venison. Frying food adds harmful fats, which makes fried foods toxic to your dog

Why Cook Venison for Dogs

Venison can be a huge benefit to your dog’s health. It is an excellent source of protein but at the same time is low in carbohydrates. It is leaner than beef and full of healthy vitamins, including B6, B12, and riboflavin.

For dogs with food-related problems, venison can be a great aid in fixing their skin issues. 

What Are Good Venison Dishes for Dogs?

You can make a variety of great dishes for your dog out of venison.

While adding seasoning to your venison dish can be delicious, using seasoning in your dog’s dish can be dangerous. Many spices are toxic to dogs, including salt, garlic, and onion. Consuming even small amounts of these spices can be fatal to your canine companion.

Venison Stew

Who says that you must filet your venison and serve it alone? Mixing veggies with your venison in a brothy stew will have your dog drooling and begging for seconds! Doggie venison stew is a simple meal that you can prep for the whole week! 

An example of base ingredients includes: 

  • 1 ½ venison cut into 2-inch cubes 
  • Chopped veggies 
  • 3 chopped carrots
  • 4 to 5 chopped small potatoes 
  • 4 cups bone broth
  • 4 tablespoons flour

These are examples of the base ingredients included in basic venison dog stews. Mix the ingredients and let them cook on the stovetop. Keep in mind that dogs cannot eat the same seasoning and vegetables that humans can. 

Venison Filet

Go ahead and cut off a piece of prime venison filet and cook it up on the grill. Nothing is more delicious than a nice, grilled piece of meat, and your dog will enjoy it just as much as you do. 

Before fileting your venison on the grill, scrape your grill clean, so no harmful and toxic seasoning gets on your venison. 

Crock-Pot Venison Roast

Roasting venison is a great way to prepare meals for your dog. Crockpots are the perfect way to cook a roast, and for picky eaters, dogs may get excited by the smell.

Some of the basic things you will need for a crockpot venison roast include:

  • Large crockpot
  • A select cut of venison
  • Mixed vegetables
  • Broth 
  • Water
  • Measuring cups

In addition to these basic requirements, you will also need other things. Be prepared and check online recipes for more direct ingredient information.

What Kind of Vegetables Can Dogs Eat? 

When choosing the type of vegetables to pair with your venison, keep in mind that some vegetables are more beneficial to dogs than others. Venison is a low-fat and low-carb protein, so you may want to choose something that compliments this light meat.

Vegetables that dogs can eat with venison include:

  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Squash
  • Cauliflower
  • Peas
  • Green beans
  • Broccoli
  • Pumpkin

Prepare a variety of vegetables to be eaten in addition to your venison. Venison is only one source of protein, and it will not provide all the vitamins and nutrients that your dogs need.

What Is the Benefit of Feeding a Dog Venison?

There are several benefits to feeding dog venison. Venison has less protein than beef, but it also has less fat and cholesterol. 

Venison has a high amount of nutrients which can be great for your dog’s health. 

Common vitamins and minerals found in venison include:

  • Zinc
  • Iron
  • Riboflavin 
  • Phosphorus 
  • B6
  • B12

Feeding your dog a venison dish provides them these valuable vitamins and minerals. 

Venison is also a good dish for pets with allergies or skin irritation. Some veterinarians will prescribe special proteins because the animal currently has food allergies to commercial pet foods.

What Are the Risks of Feeding Dogs Venison? 

The main risk that comes from feeding your dog venison is the bacteria in deer meat. A dog may contract a disease from venison if meat is fed to them raw. Because a dog can contract disease or illness from hidden bacterias, you must cook all meat before feeding it to your beloved dog.

Conclusion

Venison is a low-fat protein that many veterinarians prescribe to dog owners whose canines have food-related allergies. This specialty protein is easy to cook, and you can prepare it in various fun, fresh ways. 

You can prepare the low-fat protein venison in numerous ways, including venison chops, stew, and more. The best way to cook venison is by grilling it or preparing it on the stovetop. Limit the amount of seasoning that you place on your venison and refrain from frying the food you feed your dog.

Venison is a fantastic protein that many dog owners use to replace beef, chicken, and other meats. There are several ways to prepare venison. Always keep in mind that cooking dog food from home can cause nutrient deficiency. Monitor your dog anytime you change its diet, and consult your vet before making major changes.