Can Yorkie Dogs Eat Bread? (Solved & Explained!)

It’s safe to share a piece of bread with your Yorkie but remember that bread is a human food with no health advantages or nutritional value for your Yorkies’ diet. It’s acceptable to give it as a once-in-a-while treat with no dangerous elements, but keep in mind that anything more than a little quantity might have a negative impact on your dog’s general health.

Continue reading to learn more about feeding your Yorkie bread, as well as the dangers of overfeeding your Yorkie bread, and more.

Can Yorkies Eat Bread?

In the same way that people can eat bread in moderation, so can Yorkies. If your dog doesn’t have any allergies, plain white and wheat bread is usually safe to eat and seldom causes gastrointestinal problems.

Giving your dog a slice of bread as a treat now and then won’t hurt them as long as you provide them with enough exercise and a balanced healthy diet.

Bread, on the other hand, is only a filler item that has no nutrients not already present in your Yorkies’ meal. Bread is heavy in carbs, as everyone who has ever considered going on a diet knows, which can contribute to obesity in your dog if you are not careful.

Are There Any Nutritional Benefits to Feeding Your Yorkie Bread?

Bread Can Relieve Constipation

The fibre in whole-wheat bread keeps things moving in the digestive system. It binds to water and gives your Yorkies’ feces more volume, making it easier to pass.

Bread Cushions Indigestible Foreign Objects

Bread binds or cushions foreign objects in the stomach, such as sharp bone pieces or indigestible materials, allowing them to pass through. Although this isn’t true for all foreign objects or shards of bone, little pieces of bread can help with digestion. Before using bread in this manner, always consult your veterinarian.

Bread Can Soothe a Dog’s Upset Stomach

A modest quantity of white bread can be given to Yorkies with IBS or an upset stomach. The high starch content absorbs the gastric acids that irritate their stomachs, alleviating pain and discomfort for these pets. A quarter of a regular slice should suffice to ease the symptoms, but you should see your veterinarian for advice on portion quantity.

What Types of Bread are Safe for Dogs to Eat?

Although there are specific concerns associated with feeding your dog bread, certain types of bread can be safe. Whole wheat or high fibre white slices, for example, can be beneficial to dogs when consumed in moderation. Avoid giving your dog any bread that contains sugar or other substances, such as butter, since this might lead to weight gain and diabetes in the future.

Why Is Bread Bad for Dogs?

Bread is High in Carbs Which Can Lead to Many Health Problems for Your Yorkie

Bread is a carbohydrate-rich food. Its carbohydrates are converted to sugar in the body. Since bread offers no real nutritional value to your Yorkie, they can go without. You can safely feed your Yorkie bread as a reward or as a regular component of their diet but always be sure to feed them a balanced meal, healthy dog treats and exercise them on a regular basis.

White bread can relieve stomach discomfort and cling to foreign objects. On the other hand, excessive eating can lead to obesity, heart disease, high blood pressure, and joint discomfort.

Bread Can Cause Tooth Decay

Since sugars in bread attach to the teeth and gums, they can create problems for your Yorkies’ teeth. Sugars contribute to tooth decay by drawing bacteria to the teeth. As the degeneration worsens, periodontal disease develops. Most dogs develop dental issues by the age of three, according to vets and studies.

Never Feed Your Yorkie Bread Dough

While your dog might be able to consume a little of the finished product, the unbaked bread dough is dangerous. Due to the active yeast found in raw bread dough, it will continue to rise. This causes your dog’s stomach to distend, mimicking or possibly causing bloat, a potentially dangerous illness in which the stomach twists on itself.

If you suspect your Yorkie is suffering from bloat, see a veterinarian straight away. When the stomach rolls on itself, the blood supply is cut off, resulting in tissue necrosis and septicemia, which can cause your Yorkie to go into a coma or die if not treated right away.

Types of Bread to Avoid Feeding Your Yorkie

Bread With Seeds

Over the last few years, seeded bread and bagels have grown increasingly popular, making them a must-have in most modern homes. Although most nuts won’t harm your dog if consumed in smaller quantities, nuts like Macadamias can cause long-term damage and even death in your Yorkie if left untreated.

Even if seeds and nuts aren’t poisonous to dogs, they can induce stomach discomfort and pancreatitis, so it’s best to avoid feeding your Yorkie all forms of bread with nuts and seeds.

Cinnamon Raisin Bread

Raisins are toxic to dogs and, if ingested, can induce acute renal failure in your Yorkshire terrier. Dogs like Yorkies, who are more prone to gastrointestinal problems, are more likely to suffer from raisin poisoning since it takes less to become poisoned.

Contact your veterinarian straight away if your Yorkie consumes any raisin bread. Keep raisin bread out of your dog’s reach at all times. Also make sure to never feed your dog raisin bread, even if the portion you give them doesn’t include raisins.

Bread With Sweetener

Xylitol is a deadly chemical to be aware of whenever you feed your Yorkie food that you did not prepare yourself. Xylitol is an artificial sweetener that’s typically found in sugar-free gum. If your Yorkie were to consume it, it could cause a hazardous dip in their blood sugar, sending your little pup’s body into shock. 

Food manufacturers have, unfortunately, recently begun to include Xylitol into various products to sweeten them without using sugar. Dog owners need to note that sweet peanut butter and bread flavours almost always contain Xylitol.

Garlic Bread

Unfortunately, garlic is considered to be toxic to dogs if consumed in excessive quantities. If your Yorkie consumes any form of garlic or garlic toast, they can develop gastrointestinal distress, including diarrhea and vomiting, as well as anemia.