Toy or Not to Toy: The Debate on Putting Toys in Your Puppy’s Crate at Night

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As a new puppy owner, you may be wondering whether or not it’s a good idea to put toys in your puppy’s crate at night.

While some sources say it’s a great way to keep your puppy occupied and prevent them from getting bored, others say it’s best to keep the crate free of distractions so your puppy can focus on sleeping.

So, should you put toys in your puppy’s crate at night? The answer isn’t black and white. It depends on your puppy’s individual needs and personality, as well as your own personal preferences and goals for crate training.

Generally speaking, it’s best to start with one or two toys and see how your puppy responds. If they seem happy and entertained, you can gradually add more toys over time.

In this article, we’ll explore the pros and cons of putting toys in your puppy’s crate at night, and offer some tips for making the best decision for your pet.

Why Put Toys in Your Puppy’s Crate?

As a new puppy owner, you might be wondering whether you should put toys in your puppy’s crate at night. The answer is yes, and in this section, we’ll explore why.

Reducing Anxiety and Stress

Just like humans, dogs can experience anxiety and stress. Being in a new environment, away from their littermates and mother, can be a stressful experience for a puppy.

Toys in the crate can help reduce anxiety and provide comfort to your pup.

Chewing on a toy can be a soothing activity for puppies and can help them relax and feel more secure in their crate.

Additionally, toys can help distract your puppy from any outside noises or stimuli that may be causing them stress. A toy to focus on can help your puppy feel safe and secure in their crate, reducing their anxiety and helping them sleep better at night.

Preventing Destructive Behaviors

Puppies are known for their love of chewing, and if they don’t have appropriate toys to chew on, they may turn to other items in their crate, such as bedding or even the crate itself.

This can lead to destructive behaviors and even potential health hazards if your puppy ingests any of the materials.

By providing your puppy with safe and appropriate toys to chew on, you can redirect their chewing behavior and prevent destructive behaviors in their crate.

It’s important to note that not all toys are appropriate for puppies, especially those who are strong chewers. Avoid toys with small parts that can be easily chewed off and swallowed, and always supervise your puppy when they are playing with toys in their crate.

By putting toys in your puppy’s crate at night, you can help reduce their anxiety and prevent destructive behaviors, creating a safe and comfortable environment for your pet to sleep in.

When to Avoid Toys in Your Puppy’s Crate

As much as toys can be a great addition to your puppy’s crate, there are certain situations where it’s best to avoid them. In this section, we’ll explore two scenarios where it’s best to leave the toys out of the crate: choking hazards and overstimulation.

Choking Hazards

One of the biggest concerns with toys in a puppy’s crate is the risk of choking. Puppies are known to be curious and love to explore their surroundings, which includes chewing on toys.

However, if the toy is too small or has small parts that can break off, it can easily become a choking hazard. To avoid this, make sure to choose toys that are appropriate for your puppy’s size and age.

Always supervise your puppy when they’re playing with toys and regularly inspect them for signs of wear and tear. If a toy is starting to break down, it’s time to replace it.

Overstimulation

While toys can be a great way to keep your puppy entertained, too much stimulation can have the opposite effect. If your puppy has too many toys in their crate or they’re too exciting, they may become overstimulated and have trouble settling down.

To avoid this, limit the number of toys in the crate and choose ones that are more calming, such as chew toys or stuffed animals. Avoid toys that make noise or have flashing lights, as these can be too stimulating for a puppy trying to sleep.

In summary, while toys can be a great addition to your puppy’s crate, it’s important to be mindful of choking hazards and overstimulation. Choose appropriate toys and limit the number in the crate, and always supervise your puppy when they’re playing with them.

Choosing the Right Toys for Your Puppy

As a new puppy owner, you want to provide your pet with everything they need to feel comfortable and happy in their crate at night. Toys can be a great way to help your puppy feel safe and secure, but it’s important to choose the right ones. In this section, we’ll explore the key factors to consider when selecting toys for your puppy’s crate.

Size and Durability

When it comes to choosing toys for your puppy’s crate, size and durability are critical considerations. You want to choose toys that are the right size for your puppy – not too small that they could be a choking hazard, but not too big that they take up too much space in the crate.

Additionally, you want to choose toys that are durable and can withstand your puppy’s chewing habits.

Look for toys that are labeled as “indestructible” or “heavy-duty” to ensure they can withstand your puppy’s sharp teeth. Avoid toys with small parts or stuffing that could be easily torn out and ingested.

Soft toys with foam stuffing, for example, can be a choking hazard if your puppy tears them open.

Texture and Material

The texture and material of your puppy’s toys can also play a role in their comfort and safety. Look for toys that have a variety of textures, such as rubber, rope, and plush, to provide your puppy with different sensations to chew on.

Avoid toys with sharp edges or rough surfaces that could harm your puppy’s mouth.

Additionally, consider the materials used to make the toys. Natural materials, such as rubber and cotton, are generally safer than synthetic materials, such as plastic and nylon.

If your puppy has any allergies, be sure to choose toys made from materials that won’t trigger a reaction.

Interactive Toys

Finally, consider adding interactive toys to your puppy’s crate to keep them entertained and engaged. Puzzle toys, for example, can provide mental stimulation and help prevent boredom.

Treat-dispensing toys can also be a great way to reward your puppy for good behavior and keep them occupied for longer periods of time.

When selecting interactive toys, be sure to choose ones that are appropriate for your puppy’s age and skill level. Toys that are too difficult can frustrate your puppy, while toys that are too easy may not provide enough stimulation.

By considering these factors when choosing toys for your puppy’s crate, you can help ensure their safety, comfort, and happiness throughout the night.

How Many Toys to Put in Your Puppy’s Crate

Your puppy’s crate is their safe haven, and it’s important to make it as comfortable and enjoyable as possible. One way to do this is by providing them with toys to play with while they’re in there.

However, you don’t want to overload their crate with too many toys, as this can become overwhelming and even dangerous.

So, how many toys should you put in your puppy’s crate at night? The answer to this question depends on a few factors, such as your puppy’s age, breed, and personality. Generally speaking, it’s best to start with one or two toys and see how your puppy responds. If they seem happy and entertained, you can gradually add more toys over time.

When choosing toys to put in your puppy’s crate, make sure they are appropriate for their age and size. Avoid toys that are too small and could be a choking hazard, as well as toys that are too big and could cause injury if your puppy tries to chew on them.

It’s also a good idea to rotate your puppy’s toys regularly, so they don’t get bored with the same ones. This can help keep them entertained and prevent destructive behavior in their crate.

In summary, it’s important to provide your puppy with toys in their crate, but not to overload it with too many. Start with one or two appropriate toys and gradually add more over time. Remember to rotate their toys regularly to keep them entertained and prevent destructive behavior.

Conclusion

After considering all the factors, it is safe to say that putting toys in your puppy’s crate at night is a good idea. Not only do toys provide comfort and entertainment to your pup, but they can also help alleviate anxiety and boredom.

However, it is important to choose the right toys for your puppy. Durable toys that are appropriately sized for your pup’s mouth are the best option. Avoid leaving soft or plush toys in the crate as they can pose a choking hazard.

It is also important to monitor your puppy’s behavior with toys in the crate. If your pup becomes destructive or chews on the toys excessively, it may be best to remove them from the crate at night.

Overall, providing your puppy with toys in their crate at night can be a great way to promote comfort and relaxation. Just be sure to choose the right toys and monitor your pup’s behavior with them.

We hope this article has helped answer the question of whether or not to put toys in your puppy’s crate at night. Remember, every puppy is different, and what works for one may not work for another. It’s important to observe your pup’s behavior and adjust accordingly.

FAQ

Can puppies sleep with toys in crate?

Yes, your puppy can sleep just fine with toys in the crate, provided that you don’t clutter it up. A few toys in the crate are always a good idea, as they give your puppy something to chew on and play with in case they wake up in the night and get bored.

Just make sure that you don’t put anything in their with stuffing inside, or they might chew through the toy and ingest what’s inside!

What should puppies have in their crate at night?

Keep it simple. Inside the crate you will want to have some comfortable bedding and a toy or two for your puppy. Something that your puppy can chew on is always a good idea, as they are still teething and this will not only help with that but it keeps them occupied for a good, long time.

How do I keep my dog entertained in his crate?

One of the best ways to keep an adult dog occupied inside their crate is a Kong toy. Kong toys are made from a hard rubber and hollowed out, so that you can put things like cream cheese or peanut butter inside them. Fill the toy, freeze it, and give it to your dog.

They can spend time getting at the filling and they’ll have the toy to chew on for later.

Should I put a blanket on my dog’s crate?

You can put a blanket on, but only cover the crate partially. Fully covering the crate with a blanket can be a little restrictive to airflow and can make the inside of the crate a bit stuffy. Don’t worry, your dog has fur to keep them warm, plus the bedding already inside of the crate – they’re going to be just fine.

How do I get my dog to sleep in his crate without crying?

One trick to get your dog used to sleeping in the crate is to sit close to it, remaining silent, and then after 5 to 10 minutes you should get up and move quietly into another room. Stay there for approximately 10 minutes and then come back, sitting down quietly again next to the crate.

Repeat this process, extending the time that you are in the other room, and eventually your dog will trust that you will always come back and they’ll be more comfortable sleeping within the crate.  

What do you do when your puppy cries at night?

If you are taking your puppy out regularly, then crying at night should be ignored. Responding to crying every time can teach your dog that they will get their way if they are vocal.

By ignoring the crying, you are teaching them that this is not the way to get your attention, and they will eventually learn this and should settle down.

What should I put in my puppy’s crate during the day?

The inside of your puppy’s crate should be fairly spartan. You only want to have bedding so that they can rest and a few toys to keep them occupied when they are awake. Don’t put food or water inside – a puppy needs to go outside 5 to 30 minutes after eating, so food and water are a bad idea.

Your puppy can eat and drink outside of the crate, the inside is for rest and relaxation.  

Should I leave a pee pad in the crate?

No. A pee pad is going to end up getting chewed on, eventually, and you don’t want to risk your dog getting impacted intestines from ingested bits of pee pad. Even if this doesn’t happen, a pee pad inside the crate teaches your dog that it’s okay to pee inside the crate, and this is another thing that you want to avoid.

A regular potty training schedule is a much better way to go.

Should I put a bed in my puppy’s crate?

 Yes, you should have a bed or some sort of comfortable bedding inside your puppy’s crate. Aside from the training purposes that it serves, your puppy’s crate is essentially a ‘mobile den’, and you want your puppy to associate it with comfort, warmth, and relaxation.

A good bed will accomplish exactly this and make it easier to get your puppy used to the crate.

Should I leave water in crate with puppy?

No. Your puppy gets enough hydration outside of the crate, and putting water inside the crate is not only unnecessary, but it’s a recipe for trouble. That’s because your puppy is going to need to go to the bathroom much faster than normal if they are drinking water – their little bladders need emptying every 2-3 hours, depending on age!

Can my puppy go all night without water?

Yes! Your puppy gets enough water from their bowl and from their food during the day, so you don’t need to add a water bowl to the crate – your puppy will be just fine. Adding a water bowl to the crate will just make them need to go outside sooner and is a recipe for ‘surprise urination’ in your puppy’s crate.

Should I put a mat in my dog’s crate?

A mat, a dog bed, or even some folded and chew-resistant blankets are definitely needed inside a crate. You want your dog to associate the crate with comfort, so that they start to view it as their own personal space. That means it is vital that you make the crate comfortable or your dog won’t want to go inside!


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