Dog Poop DNA: Can HOAs Test Your Dog? 16 Things To Know

Homeowners associations are taking DNA samples from dog poop to help residents know what type of animal is going to the bathroom on their lawn. This article will go over 16 things you should know about this new trend in HOAs.

What is a Doggie DNA Community?

A Doggie DNA community is a residential area, like an apartment complex, that is part of PooPrints or a similar business. The community is created by the landlord and the tenants agree to live in the community by choosing to live in the apartment.

The DNA community means that every dog that lives in the community has their DNA on file. When poop is left around and not picked up, a sample of it can be sent to PooPrints or the other business for identification.

The dog is identified and the tenant is either warned or fined.

A Doggie DNA community strives to create a clean and healthy environment without pet waste.

Can Apartments DNA Test Your Dog Legally?

Apartments can legally test your dog’s DNA if it’s in the contract you signed. They cannot legally test your dog’s DNA if you haven’t signed a lease that states they have the ability to do so.

Some tenants are grandfathered into the community. This means they don’t have to pay the fee that goes with registering their dog. They also don’t have to worry about being fined or tested until their lease is up. When it comes time to renew their lease, however, the regulation is likely part of the new lease.

At that point, tenants either have to choose to leave or accept to have their dog’s poop tested if they don’t pick it up.

Why Do Apartments DNA Test Dogs?

Apartments DNA test dogs to find out what owner didn’t pick up their poop. It’s an attempt to cut down on the problem with tenants leaving their dog’s poop behind.

Dog poop is extremely hazardous. In areas like apartments where 100 tenants could have 100 dogs, that’s a lot of poop in a single area. It can contaminate the water, soil, and air that they breathe.

Since it’s difficult to identify which owner left their dog poop behind, DNA tests can help. Labs like PooPrints can trace the poop back to the dog which can then indicate the owner. It forces dog owners to be responsible for their pet’s waste.

Average HOA Condo Fine for Not Picking Up Poop

The average HOA condo fine for not picking up poop is between $50 and $100. Some condos will also increase the fine with each infraction.

Can My Landlord Charge Me for Dog Poop?

If your lease states that it’s your legal responsibility to pick up after your dog, then yes, your landlord can charge you for not doing so. Many landlords include some sort of clause of pet waste in their leases.

You need to read your lease to determine if the clause exists. If it doesn’t, then they can’t charge you a fine for leaving your dog’s waste in the grass.

Is There DNA In Dog Poop?

There is DNA in dog poop. Mitochondria can be found in poop. Each mitochondrion is unique to the individual. Sometimes blood and other bodily fluids can be found as part of the poop, too. That also includes DNA.

How Much Does it Cost to DNA Test Dog Poop?

It costs around $70 to test a dog’s poop. If the landlord is submitting the test, then they can get their money back by fining the dog owner when they see the results of the test.

What is PooPrints and How Does It Work?

PooPrints is a DNA testing facility specifically for testing the DNA in dog poop. They work primarily with apartment landlords but also other property owners and HOA organizations.

It works by first submitting a swab of every dog’s cheek to PooPrints. This is usually done after a tenant signs their lease with the apartment. The DNA is then placed in a database with the dog and owner’s information.

Any time that owner doesn’t pick up their dog’s poop, then the landlord can take a small sample of it and submit it to PooPrints. The lab can process it and identify who the poop belongs to.

Then the information is sent to the landlord. They can take the necessary steps from there. It usually includes fining the pet owner.

What is the Poo Prints Program?

The program is how you sign up to be part of PooPrints’ community. For landlords, it allows you to use their testing facility. You can submit DNA samples to them for identification.

How Much Does PooPrints Cost?

PooPrints charges $30 and $50 for poop testing. The further you are away from the facility, the more likely you are to pay $50 rather than $30. You only need to pay this amount when you need a test performed.

The initial cost can be difficult, too. You need to have every dog on the property given a cheek swab. That DNA information will be submitted to PooPrints and placed in a database. You still need to pay for each of those tests.

If you have 100 dogs to test and it costs you $50 per test, then you’re looking at $5,000 to get started.

What is a Poo Printing Fee?

The Poo Printing fee is a fee attached to the initiation process. When a new tenant arrives with their dog, they need to have their cheek swabbed. The DNA needs to be sent to PooPrints. The amount charged for this service is $50 and is called the Poo Printing Fee.

How Much Does PooPrints Cost?

PooPrints cost either $30 or $50 based on your location and a few other factors. The cost is associated with the price of testing. You only need to pay that amount when you need a sample tested.

How Accurate are Dog Poop DNA Tests?

It depends on the number of markers used in the specific DNA test. Dog poop, itself, contains plenty of DNA for accurate testing. If several genetic markers are matched, then the test becomes more accurate. If only a few genetic markers are matched, then it’s not as accurate.

How Accurate is PooPrints?

They’re extremely accurate. PooPrints uses 16 genetic markers to make a match. The odds of finding another dog match that sample is one in 44 sextillions.

Does PooPrints Test Breed?

They do not perform breed tests. The 16 genetic markers they test for don’t have anything to do with either the breed or physical aspects of the dog.

Can You Identify a Dog by Its Poop?

You can identify a dog by its poop through DNA. With a genetic profile on hand, it’s possible to match genetic markers between the sample that was submitted earlier and the test sample.

If enough genetic markers are a match, then the dog can be identified.