Should I Crate My Chihuahua at Night? (Solved & Explained!)

Yes. Crate training is useful, for those times when you need to take your dog to the vet, for potty training, and for putting your dog safely away when there are too many people around and wandering the house could get your dog stepped on or otherwise hurt.

Getting your dog to sleep in the crate at night also helps if you tend to wake up in the middle of the night, as it can keep you from accidentally harming your dog as well.

That said, you’ll need to be patient – it takes awhile for them to get used to the crate and while they are puppies you’ll need to wake up to take them out.

By 6 months of age, they should be able to stay 6 up to 8 hours asleep and overnight in their crate, but until then your puppy will need your assistance going out.

In today’s article, we’ll tell you a little more about the finer points of crate training your Chihuauhua. We’ve selected questions trending the web this week on the subject of crating, so read on for important information that can help ensure that your Chi learns quickly and the RIGHT way.

Let’s take a look at what you’ll need to know!

Is it cruel to crate a Chihuahua at night?

No, it is not cruel, but it may take your Chi a little while to get used it. You also will need to schedule regular potty breaks, especially if you have a puppy.

When they are just pups, Chihuahuas don’t have a lot of control over their bladders. As such, they can wait for approximately 1 hour for every month of age before they need to go outside.

Walking your dog for a little longer than usual can get them to sleep a little longer but expect at least 1 or 2 late-night walks until your puppy is old enough to wait.

How long can you crate a Chihuahua?

The longest that you should crate your Chihuahua is 8 hours and this is only with adult dogs – not puppies or senior dogs. With puppies, they can wait 1 hour for every month of age before needing to go outside and senior dogs will vary based on their health.

If you need to be away for longer periods or are dealing with an older Chi or a pup, then it is best to get the assistance of a friend or hire a dogsitter to help break up the tedium.

Too much time on their own can lead to depression, acting out, and even self-harm, so be sure to only use the crate when absolutely necessary.

How do you crate train a Chihuahua at night?

The first step is putting in some nice bedding, along with a few toys (but not enough to make sleeping uncomfortable). Leave the crate door open at night, but close your bedroom door, and while your Chi may wander a bit at first, they should find their way on their own to the crate and the soft bed inside.

Put a treat or two in there for a little extra insurance, so that they will go in to get the treats and can see what the crate is like inside.

What is the best size crate for a Chihuahua?

The standard ‘small’ crate size measures between 18 to 22 inches and is a suitable crate for a Chihuahua. You can get one that is a little bigger, but don’t overdo it. Dogs are den animals and what looks a little cramped to you might well be the perfect size.

A crate that is too big simply doesn’t feel as safe for a dog, so make any size adjustments minor ones to ensure maximum canine comfort.

How do I get my Chihuahua to stop whining in his crate?

First off, don’t automatically ignore whining – sometimes your dog does this for good reason! That said, when your Chi is whining in their crate, make sure that they have gone outside for a potty break and if not, take them out.

Next, pick up your dog gently, holding their back legs for support, and make sure that they don’t have any tender or possibly injured spots.

If it seems that your dog is fine and doesn’t need to go out, then the whining is likely just for attention, so at this point it is safe to ignore them until the time for their next potty break.

Resist the urge to come running when they cry out at this point – it will only teach them that it’s acceptable to whine for attention and it will take a while to teach them otherwise!

Where should you put a Chihuahua crate in the house?

The best place to put your Chis crate is going to be in your bedroom, placed so that your dog can easily see you. This helps them to feel safe in their new spot, as seeing you is reassuring to them.

Leave the crate door open and the bedroom door closed, turn off the light, and your dog should eventually settle for sleep in their crate when they tire out. Just be very careful if you get up in the night so that you don’t accidentally step on a paw or worse!

Where should a Chihuahua sleep at night?

Ideally, your Chihuahua should sleep in the bedroom, in their own bed or in a crate. The crate is better and if you tend to get up in the middle of the night, then you might consider closing the crate door for safety.

Normally you should leave the door open at night to help them adjust, but as these litte dogs are fragile you can certainly close it for added safety – it will just take your dog a little longer to adjust to the crate.

What kind of beds do Chihuahuas like?

Soft and fluffy is the ‘ticket’ when it comes to a Chihuahua and their very own bed. Look for the softest one that you can find and a circular shape is best, so that your Chi can curl up into a little ball and sleep comfortably.

You can also put a soft, fluffy blanket or child’s comforter halfway over the bed, so that your Chi can burrow slightly under it. Chihuahuas love doing this and it helps your little one to sleep soundly, warm and cozy under the comforter that you gave them.

How long until my Chihuahua gets used to their crate?

It varies from dog to dog, but generally it can take anywhere from a few day to a couple of weeks. Hang in there – your Chihuahua will get used to it – but for now they are in a new house, with new smells, sounds, and people.

Be patient with them and before you know it, they’ll start to see the crate as their own, personal space.

Why is my Chihuahua shaking in their crate?

Chihuahuas sleep a lot but it’s because they are little lightning-bolts when they are awake. As such, you’ll see them shaking from time to time, and this is just excitement. In the crate, it can mean that your dog is nervous, so this is a good time to introduce a chew toy to help distract them.

Once they learn that they are safe in the crate, this behavior should disappear, it just takes a little time.