Can a Cat Use a Dog Flap? (Solved & Explained!)

Yes, unless it’s a very large dog flap with a heavy vinyl construction, such as an Endura model. Endura uses 1/3 of an inch thick vinyl, as opposed to the industry standard ¼ thickness employed in most cat flaps. Otherwise, in all likelihood your cat can and WILL be using the dog’s door.

In today’s article, we’re going to cover a number of cat flap door questions that people just like you have been asking this week. What cat flaps are the best? Can they really affect your insurance? Read on for the answers to these and other important questions that we’ve collected in the sections below.

How do I keep my cat from using the dog door?

Keeping your cat from using a dog door can be tricky. With an automatic door that responds to a microchip in your dog’s collar, you can minimize the chances of your cat getting out, but if they follow the dog then they could get locked out accidentally!

If you have a large dog, a better strategy is to a thicker, heavier flap which will be harder for your cat to move, or even better – switch to 2 heavy flaps. This better insulates the door against drafts and may well be too heavy for your kitty to move.

How do you train a cat to use a flap door?

To train your cat to use a cat flap door, you should try propping it open with a stick or something similar and simply call them from the other side, holding up a treat.

Your cat may be tentative about it – some are a little shy if it’s their first time outside – but your cat will want that treat and will come through if you’re patient. After doing this a few times, close the door and call your kitty from the other side and watch what happens.

Your cat will paw at the door and eventually poke their head through, and once they see that they can get back in on their own then the job is done – your kitty will start using their new door on their own.

Are cat flaps a good idea?

Cat flap doors come with a lot of benefits, but also a few caveats. On the benefit side, your cat gets more freedom and you will save time not having to always let them in and out. Litter box maintenance will also lessen, as your cat will often simply go outside.

On the flipside, a cat flap does create a security vulnerability, and burglars have been known to stick canes or poles through such openings in an attempt to ‘fish’ something out or otherwise compromise your home security.

Added security such as motion detectors, cameras, or the use of an electronic cat door that opens and closes when a chip in your cat’s collar activates it are good ways to help reduce the downsides of having a cat door installed in your home.

Does a cat flap affect home insurance?

Yes, a cat flap door can potentially affect your home insurance, so you need to check with your provider in advance to see if this is the case.

Additional security or premiums may be required and so checking this is going to be essential – you don’t want to have to make an insurance claim in the future, only to find that your cat door has voided or reduced your coverage!

Why won’t my cat use a cat flap?

When a cat doesn’t like their cat flap, it’s generally an issue with shyness. Some indoor cats have no desire to go outside, while others are curious but still frightened of what might be out there.

The location where you install it can make a difference, too, with a good location being a cat door in a window leading to an empty alley where the cat can sneak in and out while still feeling safe. Try propping the cat door open and luring your cat out with treats.

Sometimes it just a matter of getting your cat to use it a time or two and they’ll become addicted all on their own.

How long does it take for a cat to learn to use a cat flap?

That all depends on your cat. Some cats will learn to use the cat flap within minutes, while others may be a bit more shy about it and take days or even weeks before they get curious enough to give it a try.

The best thing to do is to prop it open at first so that your cat can see what’s out there and come in and out on their own with the door held open. After a few days, simply close the door, and let your cat’s famous curiosity handle the rest!

What is the best cat flap?

Microchip cat flap doors are the best to have, as they will close securely when your cat is not using them. This keeps out rain, wind drafts, and can also discourage burglars (or you can install an alarm in it for additional security!).

Top models include the Cat Mate 360W, the SureFlap Microchip door, and the PetSafe Microchip cat door.

How high can a cat flap be?

You can put a cat flap about 6 inches above the bottom of the door. This way, you cat can still easily use it, but it’s also high enough that if you get any flooding due to inclement weather then you won’t have to worry about all of that rainwater coming inside.

Are cat flaps draughty?

Cat flaps can be on the drafty side, but if yours doesn’t automatically lock or have a securing mechanism, then you can DIY a makeshift solution. Buy a bunch of small magnets and a strip of metal to install in the base of the door, under the flap.

Attach the magnets to the bottom of the flap and they will stick in place on the strip, minimizing the chances of wind blowing through the cat door while still making it usable by your kitty.

Can older cats learn to use a cat flap?

Yes, older can definitely learn to use a cat flap and will appreciate the convenience. You may need to prop it open and lure them to the other side with a treat, then go into your house and repeat the process from indoors.

After a few times, your cat will get the idea, and should start taking advantage of their newfound freedom.